• Keep the Ocean Colorful

    The long-term sustainability of the marine ornamental industry is being threatened by environmental pressures that are severely degrading the health of coral reef ecosystems. OE Lab. develops 'reef friendly' aquaculture technologies to restore degraded wild populations. Our achievements in marine ornamental fish culture could efficiently promote reproduction and propagation techniques.

    Bluestriped Angelfish


    The Bluestriped Angelfish(Holacanthus septentrionalis) is known from coastal rocky and coral reefs, to depths of 50m (163ft), where it occurs singly and in pairs and may be observed feeding on sponges and tunicates. This species is well suited to peaceful established aquaria with plenty of living rock. Angelfish from the Chaetodontoplus genus are not seen in the trade all that regularly, and many species are highly prized amongst serious hobbyists. The Bluestriped Angelfish, as the common name suggests, sports vivid blue horizontal stripes on a yellow to tan coloured background, and these eye-catching stripes continue onto the dorsal and anal fins. The tail, pelvic, and pectoral fins are bright yellow. As the fish matures, a dark spot encircled by blue will develop at the base of each pectoral fin. Juvenile fish differ greatly from the adults. They have a darker background colour (almost black) and flaunt a yellow curved bar just behind the eye and over the gill cover; there are yellow margins to the posterior of the dorsal and anal fins, and as the blue body stripes start to develop, these may be slightly reticulated. When first introduced to the aquarium, the Bluestriped Angelfish may be a little shy. However, the more hiding places within the tank, the more likely it will be that the angelfish will feel safe enough to swim out and about in full view whilst browsing for filamentous algae and diatoms.Tankmates must be chosen carefully as this fish will be reluctant to feed if there is competition from boisterous or aggressive species. Keep only one Bluestriped Angelfish per tank, and not with any other angelfish. Additionally, vigilance is also advised when keeping alongside certain butterflyfish species, as larger Bluestriped Angelfish have been known to be a little antagonistic with them. Ideally, the Bluestriped Angelfish will be the last addition to the aquarium.

    Bluespotted Angelfish


    The secretive Bluespotted Angelfish (Chaetodontoplus caeruleopunctatus)is a relatively small species which is suited to peaceful established aquaria with plenty of living rock. Angelfish from the Chaetodontoplus genus are not seen in the trade all that regularly, and many species are highly prized amongst serious hobbyists. The Bluespotted Angelfish, as the common name suggests, is a particularly pretty species that is speckled with tiny blue glittery dots, also has a vivid yellow tail, and appears to be wearing bright blue lipstick! Tankmates must be chosen carefully as this fish will be reluctant to feed if there is competition from boisterous or aggressive species. Keep only one Bluespotted Angelfish per tank, and not with any other angelfish. The more hiding places within the tank, the more likely it will be that this fish will feel safe enough to swim out and about in full view whilst browsing on the aquarium décor for filamentous algae and diatoms.

    Black Velvet Angelfish


    The Black Velvet Angelfish (Chaetodontoplus melanosoma)is known from coastal reefs and drop-offs that are exposed to strong tidal currents, where they occur singly or in pairs, feeding on sponges and tunicates. Juveniles are often observed on deeper rubble slopes with rich invertebrate growth. This species is well suited to peaceful established aquaria with plenty of living rock. Angelfish from the Chaetodontoplus genus are not seen in the trade all that regularly, and many species are highly prized amongst serious hobbyists. The Black Velvet Angelfish, as the common name suggests, is predominantly black but with a variable-sized splash of grey on the face and the anterior upper half of the body. The top of the head is adorned with orange-yellow markings, and the tail and posterior of the dorsal and the anal fin are bright yellow. Juvenile fish sport a pale yellow curved bar just behind the eye and over the gill cover, and the yellow accents on the dorsal and anal fins are much bolder. Tankmates must be chosen carefully as this fish will be reluctant to feed if there is competition from boisterous or aggressive species.Caution is advised when adding the Black Velvet Angelfish to reef aquaria, as selected invertebrates may be nipped at; success is more likely in XXL reef systems where the fish is less likely to cause such irreparable damage, although there are absolutely no guarantees. This species is better suited to a fish-only with live rock system, which has been set up to house and meet the needs of shy, peaceful fish only.

    Vermiculated Angelfish


    The Vermiculated Angelfish's(Chaetodontoplus mesoleucus ) body is white behind the eye, gradually changing to dark grey posteriorly. The snout is yellow and a broad black band passes through the eye. The caudal fin is grey-blue or yellow.The species inhabits inner coral reefs and lagoons at depths from 1 m to 20 m. Vermiculated Angelfish occurs in tropical marine waters of the Western Pacific, from South-east Asia, north to Japan, south to Australia and east to the Solomon Islands. In Australia it is known from the Kimberley region on the northern coast of Western Australia and along the Northern Territory coast. The map below shows the Australian distribution of the species based on public sightings and specimens in Australian Museums. They usually feed on sponges, sea squirts and algae. Male-female pairs were predominant, and the sex-ratio showed only a slight skew towards females. However, the presence of single male, two-female social groups demonstrates that the species is polygamous. Small size of social groups is attributed to a preference for a habitat lacking structural complexity.